Kubernetes

What is Kubernetes?

Kubernetes is a software controls, that large pools of compute, storage, and networking resources across a cluster, managed through a dashboard or via the Kubernetes API.

Companies

 

Kubernetes is being used in a number of vendor solutions including Mesosphere for its DC/OS product, Rancher Labs for its container management platform, Pivotal for its PKS product, Red Hat for its OpenShift product, CoreOS for its Tectonic product, Mirantis for its Mirantis Cloud Platform,and IBM for its IBM Cloud Container Service and IBM Cloud Private product. Oracle joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation as a platinum member on September 13, 2017. Oracle open sourced a Kubernetes installer for Oracle Cloud Infrastructure and released Kubernetes on Oracle Linux.

How it works?

 

Kubernetes works with popular enterprise and open source technologies making it ideal for heterogeneous infrastructure.

Design

 

Kubernetes defines a set of building blocks (“primitives”) which collectively provide mechanisms for deploying, maintaining, and scaling applications. The components which make up Kubernetes are designed to be loosely coupled and extensible so that it can meet a wide variety of different workloads. The extensibility is provided in large part by the Kubernetes API, which is used by internal components as well as extensions and containers running on Kubernetes.

Kubernetes

 

Kubernetes is a software, that controls large pools of compute, storage, and networking resources across a cluster, managed through a dashboard or via the Kubernetes API. Kubernetes works with popular enterprise and open source technologies making it ideal for heterogeneous infrastructure. 

Why Kubernets?

 

Kubernetes (κυβερνήτης, Greek for “helmsman” or “pilot”) was founded by Joe Beda, Brendan Burns and Craig McLuckie, was quickly joined by other Google engineers including Brian Grant and Tim Hockin, and was first announced by Google in mid-2014. Its development and design are heavily influenced by Google’s Borg system, and many of the top contributors to the project previously worked on Borg. The original codename for Kubernetes within Google was Project Seven, a reference to Star Trek character Seven of Nine that is a ‘friendlier’ Borg. The seven spokes on the wheel of the Kubernetes logo is a nod to that codename.

High Availability

 

The Kubernetes Master is the main controlling unit of the cluster that manages its workload and directs communication across the system. The Kubernetes control plane consists of various components, each its own process, that can run both on a single master node or on multiple masters supporting high-availability clusters.

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